More Wizard’s Tale Talk

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A couple of interviews with me about the forthcoming new edition of The Wizard’s Tale have hit the web, so I figured I should link to them here.
Today sees Busiek Concocts a “Wizard’s Tale,” at Comic Book Resources.
And a few days ago, there was Writer Kurt Busiek Tells “An Odd And Ironic Fairy Tale” at Newsarama. [Readers seeing this via my Facebook page already got this link back then, but I never got around to posting it here.]
I think that’s it for the promo interviews on this one, but I’m never sure.

On Characters & Sandboxes

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“I went back and looked at Iron Fist’s origin, and the guy who killed his father had been dealt with, but his mother had been killed by wolves. And he couldn’t exactly get revenge for that. What’s he gonna do, kick some Gil Kane wolf in the chops and say, ‘That’s for Mom, you hairy bastard!’?”

So recently, I wrote about the long (and sometimes odd) list of characters I’ve created for Marvel Comics over the years, from Airborne (two of them!) to Zor. I thought at the time it was just a fun feature—I had the list, why not run it?—but it got picked up by a few sites, and was part of the biggest traffic spike this site has seen in its short history.
And now Newsarama has interviewed me about it, and you can read it all here:
Kurt Busiek: Creating Characters for Someone Else’s Sandbox
The origin of the Thunderbolts! Secrets of Astro City history! A blink-and-you’ll-miss-it cameo by Betty Brant’s mother! More about Fera than you ever wanted to know! Now how much would you pay?
Yeah? Well, okay, me neither. But anyway, it’s free.

Through the Mail Slot

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A couple of interview links, and some e-mail…
First, the interviews:
Scott Harris, longtime Avengers fan and newish blogger, has been doing some short industry interviews, and has done one with me:
The Vault: Seven Questions with Kurt Busiek
And Gail Simone, writer, raconteur and bon vivant, has launched a new Wonder Woman focused discussion board over at Comic Book Resources, where people are celebrating all aspects of the Amazing Amazon’s storied history. She’s lined up some terrific interviews, with the likes of Mindy Newell, George Pérez, Trina Robbins and others, and I’m happy to be an “other”:
Five Wonder Questions with Kurt Busiek
And the mail…
From Scott Rowland:

Regarding the possibility of “Deluxe Editions” similar to those for Ex Machina and other series, I’d prefer to see the continuation of the hardcover format already in use. They look great, and the anal retentive comics fan in me would hate to see a different size being used for any future releases.
Just my two cents.
Oh, I wouldn’t think that any new-format editions of Astro City would replace the existing formats, Scott, whether they’re Deluxe editions or Absolutes or Omibuses or whatever the latest packaging sensations are. I think you can remain confident that you’ll continue to see hardcovers and trade paperbacks like those we’ve been doing all along, and any new format would be in addition to, not instead of the existing ones.
From Eric Sellers:

I’m glad to hear Astro City is going to be on a monthly schedule.
Also a follow up question to one I asked years ago in the letter column. Will we get a new steady trade dress/logo on the title now that it’s going monthly?
We’ll get a steady trade dress, Eric, but whether it’s new or uses one of the logos we’ve already got, I don’t know yet. I like the volume 2 logo a whole lot. Then again, I like some of the alternate logos J.G. has done, too…
If anyone out there has strong opinions, feel free to let us know.

Some Brief Talkery

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I suppose I should remember to put up a link when I’m interviewed somewhere on line, shouldn’t I?
Here’s one—a brief interview about American Gothic, launching next year from Wildstorm.
I don’t think I actually said that bit about “a way of inventing an American mythology.” I think that’s from the same online description of the panel that had me comparing the series of The Outer Limits, which I’ve never actually seen. But American mythologies, known, unknown and interpreted in new ways, are a part of the whole thing, so, well, I’m drawing a distinction that’ll be better understood after people have seen the series, and I suppose I should shut up and let people find that out for themselves.
In any case, here’s me not shutting up.